: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: The National Interest (USA)

    The Ugly Truth About Nuclear Terrorism
    Apr11

    The Ugly Truth About Nuclear Terrorism

    Tom Z. Collina Security, United States We’re half a step behind. The fourth, and likely final, Nuclear Security Summit wrapped up last week, aimed at controlling nuclear bomb materials so terrorists can’t get them. To be sure, some real progress has been made. But if we take a step back and compare that progress to the immensity of...

    Can the U.S. and Russia Avoid an Arctic Arms Race?
    Apr08

    Can the U.S. and Russia Avoid an Arctic Arms Race?

    Kenneth Yalowitz, Vincent Gallucci Security, Eurasia Rivalries are less tense above the Arctic Circle—for now. The Arctic is currently experiencing major systemic changes as a result of climate change, which could produce greater international cooperation—or competition, and possibly conflict—among the states concerned. Both the United States and...

    Resetting the Reset
    Apr06

    Resetting the Reset

    Nikolas K. Gvosdev Security, Eurasia America’s next president will have to start all over with Russia. In recent weeks, I have had the honor to attend different daylong seminars convened to ponder Russia’s future under Vladimir Putin and the future of U.S.-Russia relations: a “Russia Experts Meeting” hosted by the Carnegie...

    How Poland Saved the World from Russia
    Apr03

    How Poland Saved the World from Russia

    Michael Peck History, Poland, Russia The world expected a rapid Communist victory. The Poles had other ideas. In the summer of 1920, Russia seemed poised to take over Europe. Newly victorious in the Russian Civil War, but convinced that the capitalists were bent on strangling the cradle of Communism, the Bolsheviks looked for salvation. Their...

    How Russia Undermines Nuclear Security
    Mar31

    How Russia Undermines Nuclear Security

    William Courtney, John Herbst Security, Eurasia Moscow’s saber rattling challenges Washington’s security guarantees. Russian aggression in Ukraine and nuclear saber rattling are jeopardizing the very global nonproliferation efforts that this week’s Nuclear Security Summit in Washington seeks to further. Moscow’s actions...

    Next Stop Berlin? Moscow’s Nazi-Killing Tank Unit is Back
    Mar31

    Next Stop Berlin? Moscow’s Nazi-Killing Tank Unit is Back

    Michael Peck Security, Eurasia The Kremlin invokes its glory days of European conquest. More than seventy years after it helped to destroy Nazi Germany, Russia’s most famous tank unit is back. Moscow has reactivated the First Guards Tank Army, one of six tank armies formed by the Soviet Union during World War II as the mobile, hard-hitting...

    NATO and Russia Return to the Nuclear Precipice
    Mar31

    NATO and Russia Return to the Nuclear Precipice

    Nick Ritchie, Peter Rutland Security, Eurasia The stakes of escalation are the highest they’ve been since the Cold War. In one year’s time, it is possible that Donald Trump will be sitting in the White House. Across Europe, too, nationalist leaders are on the rise. What are the security implications of these developments? One of the...

    Saving the South China Sea Without Starting World War III
    Mar29

    Saving the South China Sea Without Starting World War III

    Van Jackson Security, Asia Washington must boost Asian nations’ reconnaissance. Greater operational transparency in the South China Sea has become a strategic imperative, and the United States needs to treat it as such by investing greater resources and political capital toward increasing the shared maritime awareness of Southeast Asian...

    Russia’s Artful Exit from Syria
    Mar28

    Russia’s Artful Exit from Syria

    Alexander Kirss Security, Middle East Moscow entered and exited the conflict all within five months. Vladimir Putin’s surprise announcement that he is withdrawing the majority of Russian troops stationed in Syria will lead to much speculation over his true motives for doing so. Has the Russian military, as his announcement claimed, actually...

    The Party’s Over: Prohibitionary Politics in Ukraine
    Mar25

    The Party’s Over: Prohibitionary Politics in Ukraine

    Matthew Pennekamp, Rachel Bauman Security, Europe The outright banning of a political party is a curiously illiberal move. In a news story that skirted the dragnet of public attention, the Kiev District’s administration court on December 16 announced that it was placing a ban on the Communist Party of Ukraine (KPU). The goal of both...

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