: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: The American Interest (USA)

    Putin, the European
    May25

    Putin, the European

    “Never interrupt an enemy while he is making a mistake.” Vladimir Putin might not hold Napoleon in reverence, but these days he could surely relate to perhaps his most famous dictum. Just a few weeks back, the United States, most of the European Union, and several other states united in a common front to expel more than 100 Russian diplomats (or,...

    Malaysia’s Democratic Breakthrough
    May18

    Malaysia’s Democratic Breakthrough

    In an era of authoritarian regression, illiberal populism, and xenophobic nationalism, any faint glimmers of democratic progress are sorely needed. But Malaysia’s parliamentary elections last week gave much more than a glimmer of hope. After 61 years the authoritarian ruling coalition, Barisan Nasional (BN), and its core dominant party,...

    Turkey’s Energy Ambitions
    May09

    Turkey’s Energy Ambitions

    The year 2017 set a record in Turkey that only a few people noticed: namely, a historic peak in Russian gas deliveries. Gazprom sales to Turkish customers shot up by 17.3 percent and hit 29 billion cubic meters (bcm). This was partly due to an exceptionally harsh winter. On January 7, the cold wave sweeping down from Eastern Europe had the...

    Meet the New Boss, Same as the Old Boss
    May08

    Meet the New Boss, Same as the Old Boss

    Vladimir Putin was sworn in for a fourth term as Russia’s President yesterday. In a move that should surprise no one, he then proposed Dmitry Medvedev as his candidate for Prime Minister, a nomination that was quickly confirmed by the Russian Duma today.As I have explained before, Medvedev’s position is not a political one. It...

    Voices from Afghanistan
    May01

    Voices from Afghanistan

    “Invisible threads are the strongest ties.” ― Friedrich Nietzsche Nearly a decade ago I sat, together with Catholic philosopher Michael Novak, in the office of the Librarian of Congress, James Billington. Novak had brought us together—he was a longtime friend of Billington—and I was there to pitch an idea. I wanted the Library of Congress to host...

    Curzio Malaparte, Mon Amour
    May01

    Curzio Malaparte, Mon Amour

    I found Curzio Malaparte on my father’s bookshelf, between the volumes on Kosovo and Srebrenica. I was drawn in by the name, Kaputt, and when I turned it over, I was drawn even further in by the cover—the grin of devilish fake teeth floating in darkness on the New York Review Books edition. This was where I found him, and where I quickly...

    The Fragility Spectrum
    Apr30

    The Fragility Spectrum

    Countries in transition from war or a change in regime have posed repeated challenges to policymakers in recent years—and, repeatedly, the policymakers have come up short. Few have lived up to the expectations of their populations; more often than not, the transitions have stagnated or failed outright. Some countries—including Libya, Yemen, and...

    Inside Armenia’s Improbable “Velvet Revolution”
    Apr27

    Inside Armenia’s Improbable “Velvet Revolution”

    For the first months of 2018, observers of Armenian politics quietly wondered what would happen in April, when the nation was set to officially transition from a presidential to a parliamentary republic. Would Serzh Sargsyan, President since 2008, stay on as Prime Minister? Or would he stand down in favor of someone new? He kept quiet about his...

    Armenia’s Crisis of Legitimacy
    Apr26

    Armenia’s Crisis of Legitimacy

    The resignation of Armenia’s long-time leader Serzh Sargsyan shows that the Armenian political establishment suffers from a crisis of legitimacy. While Armenia’s political environment is likely to get more lively, there is no indication that any political force is ready to tackle the country’s main conundrum: the tight...

    Countering a Kleptocratic Kremlin
    Apr20

    Countering a Kleptocratic Kremlin

    With every passing week we have new evidence of the threat that Vladimir Putin’s kleptocracy poses to our democracy, our national security, and the entire liberal world order. Putin’s regime—something akin to an organized crime ring masquerading as a state—has looted the wealth of Russia, subjugated its people, attacked neighboring...

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