: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: New Statesman (The United Kingdom)

    Cameron needs to decide what he thinks about Russia
    Dec01

    Cameron needs to decide what he thinks about Russia

    David Cameron’s words suggest one thing, his actions quite another. David Cameron needs to decide whether he takes Russia seriously. He certainly talks a good game, calling Vladimir Putin to account for crimes against Ukrainian sovereignty and for supporting the wrong side in Syria, claiming credit for bolstering the post-Crimea sanctions...

    Is Ukraine finally getting to grips with its corruption problem?
    Nov19

    Is Ukraine finally getting to grips with its corruption problem?

    Two years of war, illness and economic pain has followed Ukraine’s revolution, and reforms are still slow to arrive. If you want to know why Ukraine had a revolution, consider this: it has one of the world’s fastest-growing HIV epidemics, and yet officials deliberately overcharged their own health ministry for anti-retrovirals to make...

    John Gray: World hunger is the result of politics, not production
    Nov18

    John Gray: World hunger is the result of politics, not production

    We can’t know when the next famine will occur, but it will be a by-product of war and politics. “If you had asked most mainstream development experts in the year 2000 to name those factors they thought would most imperil their efforts to reduce poverty globally in the new millennium, it is highly unlikely they would have mentioned a sudden...

    An escalator deep under Kyiv has the power to change the rider’s existence
    Nov04

    An escalator deep under Kyiv has the power to change the rider’s existence

    There should be some way of apprehending the wondrousness of even our most banal transports. The alternative is everyday murderousness. Here’s how Louis-Ferdinand Céline characterises travel in his trippy 1932 novel, Journey to the End of the Night: “An infinity opens up just for you – a laughable little infinity; and you fall into it.”...

    Why has the government taken international law out of the Ministerial Code?
    Oct30

    Why has the government taken international law out of the Ministerial Code?

    The developments are sinister. First published in 1992, the ministerial code sets out the standards expected of ministers and makes them accountable to the Prime Minister for their conduct in office. It has been updated by successive Prime Ministers, but one small change in the latest edition, published this month, has left both constitutional...

    How long until Putin bans Echo of Moscow, Russia’s last bastion of free speech, from the airwaves?
    Oct30

    How long until Putin bans Echo of Moscow, Russia’s last bastion of free speech, from the airwaves?

    Sergei Buntman, deputy editor of opposition-friendly radio station Echo of Moscow, gives us an insight into how long outlets like his have in Russia until they are shut down. Almost exactly 25 years ago, the Law on the Press came into force in the USSR, establishing freedom of speech, banning censorship and allowing independent media outlets to...

    Reading the Pussy Riot act
    Oct29

    Reading the Pussy Riot act

    Nadya Tolokonnikova, of female punk protest collective Pussy Riot, on the danger of UK conservatism, living in Moscow, and how the middle-class anti-Putin movement is waning. “Moscow calling!” The Belarusian rock band Brutto tear into their adaptation of the Clash classic. A roar erupts from the audience packing out Koko, the opulent late...

    I wanted to believe in Jeremy Corbyn. But I can’t believe in Seumas Milne
    Oct23

    I wanted to believe in Jeremy Corbyn. But I can’t believe in Seumas Milne

    The Labour leader’s appointment of Seumas Milne is a disaster, argues Oliver Bullough. I wish Jeremy Corbyn well, I really do. I sincerely hope he shunts important issues – renationalisation, fairness, tax justice – onto the political mainline where they belong. I was even thinking of getting involved with his revitalised Labour Party. But...

    Joseph Conrad and the lure of solitude
    Oct15

    Joseph Conrad and the lure of solitude

    The sceptical doubt that infuses Conrad’s work – particularly his last great novel, Victory – has to do with the human world, which he believed was moved by illusions. “It was the very essence of his life to be a solitary achievement, accomplished not by hermit-like withdrawal with its silence and immobility, but by a system of restless...

    Germany’s triumph: from the ruins of war, how a new European empire was built
    Jul30

    Germany’s triumph: from the ruins of war, how a new European empire was built

    European integration was designed to contain Berlin’s power – instead, it has increased it. Ein reich über alles: Hans Burgkmair the Elder’s woodcut of 1510 shows a double-heaed eagle, symbol of the Holy Roman empire. Photo: AKG-Images In a blistering speech to the Greek parliament on 15 July, the former finance minister Yanis...

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