: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: Foreign Policy Research Institute (USA)

    Collective Security without an Alliance: Finland’s Defense Relationship with Sweden
    Apr05

    Collective Security without an Alliance: Finland’s Defense Relationship with Sweden

    Recent concerns over Russian aggression have led countries all around the Baltic Sea to take their security more seriously. Poland certainly has; Sweden has, too. Those concerns have also driven Sweden closer to Finland. A country well-accustomed to the threat from Russia, Finland fought two major wars against the Soviet Union, Russia’s...

    From Poster Child to Pariah: Poland Embraces Illiberalism
    Apr04

    From Poster Child to Pariah: Poland Embraces Illiberalism

    Over the course of the past two years, onlookers have been confounded at the speed with which Poland, a darling of shock therapy economics and liberal institutionalization, has spiraled towards illiberal democracy. Since the 2015 parliamentary election, the country has made a dramatic political U-turn, which has hurt its diplomatic efforts and...

    Collective Defense or Unilateral Action: Poland’s Strategic Dilemma in the Baltics
    Mar28

    Collective Defense or Unilateral Action: Poland’s Strategic Dilemma in the Baltics

    In 1999, Poland joined the NATO Alliance. Ever since, collective defense has been at the heart of Poland’s national security strategy. But recent changes in Europe’s strategic environment may be leading Poland to think twice about whether collective defense alone can guarantee its security. The combination of a more aggressive Russia,...

    Preparing for the Worst: Poland’s Military Modernization
    Mar22

    Preparing for the Worst: Poland’s Military Modernization

    No one needs to remind Poland of the strategic dangers arising from its geography. Often sandwiched between great European powers, Poland has been invaded, carved up, and occupied for over two centuries. During World War II, its mostly flat and open terrain made it particularly vulnerable to the mechanized armies of Germany and the Soviet Union....

    The Mixed Feelings of Russian Voters
    Mar15

    The Mixed Feelings of Russian Voters

    This article has been translated into English from Russian by Maia Otarashvili, Deputy Director of the Eurasia Program at FPRI. On March 18, a significant number of Russian voters will go to the polls with mixed feelings. On the one hand, they want to vote for Putin—at least out of habit—but they are not very happy with the idea that...

    Bear at the Door: Poland Ponders its Strategic Environment
    Mar07

    Bear at the Door: Poland Ponders its Strategic Environment

    Russian behavior has long influenced how safe Poles feel. Centuries of fending off or being subjugated by Russia (or, its 20th-century incarnation, the Soviet Union) have left them with an abiding mistrust of their big and often unfriendly eastern neighbor. Needless to say, Russia’s recent aggressiveness in Eastern Europe has put many Poles...

    History Begins (Again) for the Pentagon
    Mar06

    History Begins (Again) for the Pentagon

    The views expressed in this article are the authors’ own and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Government, the U.S. Department of Defense, or the U.S. Army. Thanks to a near-myopic obsession with eradicating transnational Islamic terrorism, costly invasions and occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq, and a zero-risk approach to...

    Compete and Cooperate to Make U.S. National Security Strategies Great Again
    Mar06

    Compete and Cooperate to Make U.S. National Security Strategies Great Again

    The views expressed in this article are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. government. This article is written in response to History Begins (Again) for the Pentagon by John R. Deni, R. Evan Ellis, Nathan P. Freier, and Sumit Ganguly published on February 22, 2018. Colleagues at the U.S. Army War...

    Sweden’s Foreign Policy: Nonaligned, But Not Entirely Neutral
    Nov02

    Sweden’s Foreign Policy: Nonaligned, But Not Entirely Neutral

    In late 2014, Swedish authorities spotted what many suspected was a Russian submarine lurking off Stockholm. The incident set off alarm bells among Swedes. It reminded them of a similar incident in 1981, when a nuclear-armed Soviet Whiskey-class submarine ran aground a few kilometers outside Sweden’s main naval base.[1] Following...

    Sweden’s Foreign Policy: Nonaligned, But Not Entirely Neutral
    Nov02

    Sweden’s Foreign Policy: Nonaligned, But Not Entirely Neutral

    In late 2014, Swedish authorities spotted what many suspected was a Russian submarine lurking off Stockholm. The incident set off alarm bells among Swedes. It reminded them of a similar incident in 1981, when a nuclear-armed Soviet Whiskey-class submarine ran aground a few kilometers outside Sweden’s main naval base.[1] Following...

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