: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: Carnegie Moscow Center (Russia)

    How the Sanctions Are Helping Putin
    Mar29

    How the Sanctions Are Helping Putin

    Having found itself in a lose-lose situation, the West will most probably do nothing-keeping sanctions in place and freezing the situation. The Kremlin will be happy. Russia won’t stop meddling in Ukraine or give up Crimea. …read more Source: Carnegie Moscow...

    Going to the People-and Back Again: The Changing Shape of the Russian Regime
    Jan16

    Going to the People-and Back Again: The Changing Shape of the Russian Regime

    For most of Russian history, the country’s leaders have employed a top-down political system. When Crimea was annexed in 2014, the Kremlin temporarily allowed more decentralized patriotic activism to rally support, but they soon saw the potential risks and reverted to more centralized political control. | Русский …read more Source:...

    Gazprom’s EU Strategy Is a Dead End
    Dec06

    Gazprom’s EU Strategy Is a Dead End

    The main obstacle to energy negotiations between Russia and the EU is the clash between their perceptions of energy security. Moscow claims that the biggest threat to European energy security is Ukraine’s unreliability as a gas transit country, while Brussels believes the construction of new Russian pipelines circumventing Ukraine will do...

    Turkish Stream: The Cost of Russia’s Stubbornness
    Oct20

    Turkish Stream: The Cost of Russia’s Stubbornness

    Unlike Russian gas pumped via Ukraine and Germany, that flowing through Turkey will face tough competition from Azerbaijani, Iranian, Iraqi, and possibly even Turkmen and Israeli gas. Gazprom’s rivals won’t need to ship their gas as far, and they will have much lower pipeline construction costs. The gas market in southeastern Europe...

    Russia’s Next Move on Ukraine
    Sep27

    Russia’s Next Move on Ukraine

    The most likely scenario for eastern Ukraine is that a low-level conflict will continue to simmer. Moscow needs to give up its pipe dream that a pro-Russian government will come to power in Kiev, and forget its convenient but misleading stereotypes about its large neighbor. | Русский …read more Source: Carnegie Moscow...

    The Crimean Saboteurs and Russia’s New Ultimatum
    Aug19

    The Crimean Saboteurs and Russia’s New Ultimatum

    The Kremlin is using the alleged terrorist plot in Crimea as way of delivering an ultimatum to its Western partners. It’s saying: “You said yourselves that there can be no military solution to the deadlock over Crimea and Donbas, so go ahead and broker a peaceful settlement. If you can’t, Russia reserves the right to make the next...

    Duma Elections: Crimea Effect Caps Protest Potential
    Jun15

    Duma Elections: Crimea Effect Caps Protest Potential

    The annexation of Crimea in March 2014 fundamentally changed Russia’s political climate: support for Vladimir Putin’s regime rose and remains high, despite a certain cooldown in recent months. Discontent is building but remains far from boiling point, and we are unlikely to see large-scale protest voting or mass rallies in the...

    The Lukashenko Formula: Belarus’s Crimea Flip-Flops
    Jun01

    The Lukashenko Formula: Belarus’s Crimea Flip-Flops

    Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko has contradicted himself several times on the issue of the status of Crimea. His ambiguities have helped him to maintain good relations with both Russia and Ukraine, and to forge a new relationship with the West. | Русский …read more Source: Carnegie Moscow...

    The Savchenko Swap: Why Did Putin Free Ukraine’s Most Famous Pilot?
    May27

    The Savchenko Swap: Why Did Putin Free Ukraine’s Most Famous Pilot?

    Vladimir Putin’s decision to pardon Nadezhda Savchenko was a purely pragmatic one. Left with no viable alternatives to freeing the Ukrainian pilot, Putin was forced to make a concession that may not sit well with the Russian population, which has come to see Savchenko as a symbol of the “Kiev junta.” | Русский …read more Source:...

    The Tip of the Ukraine Iceberg: After the Dutch EU Referendum
    May17

    The Tip of the Ukraine Iceberg: After the Dutch EU Referendum

    Despite Kiev’s official rhetoric, the national consensus on integration with the EU is increasingly fragile. Pro-Russian forces are reasserting themselves in the southeast, while ultra-right activists are campaigning against the European Union in the west. On top of that, the current pro-European government has no real achievements to boast...

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