: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: Carnegie Moscow Center (Russia)

    Russia and the West’s South Caucasus Dilemma
    Nov14

    Russia and the West’s South Caucasus Dilemma

    Russia and the West have a choice in the South Caucasus. They can either treat the situation in Abkhazia and South Ossetia as being isolated from other conflicts-such as those in the Donbas and Transdniestria-or they can use it as an additional argument in their overall confrontation. | Русский …read more Source: Carnegie Moscow...

    The Victory at Stake in the Russian-Belarusian War Games
    Sep15

    The Victory at Stake in the Russian-Belarusian War Games

    Despite all the reputational risks posed by its war games with Russia, Minsk is trying to reap diplomatic benefits from them. The Belarusian military can show Western observers that Minsk’s guarantees can be trusted. On the other hand, it can convince Moscow that the country isn’t “going down the Ukrainian route,” because it...

    The Accidental Formation of Russia’s War Coalition
    Jun22

    The Accidental Formation of Russia’s War Coalition

    The Ukraine war that broke out in 2014 became possible due to the governmentalizing of the Russian economy during the 2008 crisis. But these actions didn’t anticipate war. The manual control of the Russian economy formed to fight the crisis became an important component in fighting sanctions, and even in equipping the Donbas. But it was...

    How the Sanctions Are Helping Putin
    Mar29

    How the Sanctions Are Helping Putin

    Having found itself in a lose-lose situation, the West will most probably do nothing-keeping sanctions in place and freezing the situation. The Kremlin will be happy. Russia won’t stop meddling in Ukraine or give up Crimea. …read more Source: Carnegie Moscow...

    Going to the People-and Back Again: The Changing Shape of the Russian Regime
    Jan16

    Going to the People-and Back Again: The Changing Shape of the Russian Regime

    For most of Russian history, the country’s leaders have employed a top-down political system. When Crimea was annexed in 2014, the Kremlin temporarily allowed more decentralized patriotic activism to rally support, but they soon saw the potential risks and reverted to more centralized political control. | Русский …read more Source:...

    Gazprom’s EU Strategy Is a Dead End
    Dec06

    Gazprom’s EU Strategy Is a Dead End

    The main obstacle to energy negotiations between Russia and the EU is the clash between their perceptions of energy security. Moscow claims that the biggest threat to European energy security is Ukraine’s unreliability as a gas transit country, while Brussels believes the construction of new Russian pipelines circumventing Ukraine will do...

    Turkish Stream: The Cost of Russia’s Stubbornness
    Oct20

    Turkish Stream: The Cost of Russia’s Stubbornness

    Unlike Russian gas pumped via Ukraine and Germany, that flowing through Turkey will face tough competition from Azerbaijani, Iranian, Iraqi, and possibly even Turkmen and Israeli gas. Gazprom’s rivals won’t need to ship their gas as far, and they will have much lower pipeline construction costs. The gas market in southeastern Europe...

    Russia’s Next Move on Ukraine
    Sep27

    Russia’s Next Move on Ukraine

    The most likely scenario for eastern Ukraine is that a low-level conflict will continue to simmer. Moscow needs to give up its pipe dream that a pro-Russian government will come to power in Kiev, and forget its convenient but misleading stereotypes about its large neighbor. | Русский …read more Source: Carnegie Moscow...

    The Crimean Saboteurs and Russia’s New Ultimatum
    Aug19

    The Crimean Saboteurs and Russia’s New Ultimatum

    The Kremlin is using the alleged terrorist plot in Crimea as way of delivering an ultimatum to its Western partners. It’s saying: “You said yourselves that there can be no military solution to the deadlock over Crimea and Donbas, so go ahead and broker a peaceful settlement. If you can’t, Russia reserves the right to make the next...

    Duma Elections: Crimea Effect Caps Protest Potential
    Jun15

    Duma Elections: Crimea Effect Caps Protest Potential

    The annexation of Crimea in March 2014 fundamentally changed Russia’s political climate: support for Vladimir Putin’s regime rose and remains high, despite a certain cooldown in recent months. Discontent is building but remains far from boiling point, and we are unlikely to see large-scale protest voting or mass rallies in the...

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