: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (USA)

    Bye-Bye, Abkhazia, Crimea, South Ossetia!
    Mar30

    Bye-Bye, Abkhazia, Crimea, South Ossetia!

    European governments are powerless to prevent the erosion of the security architecture set out in the 1975 Helsinki Final Act. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    Remember Crimea? A Year Later
    Mar27

    Remember Crimea? A Year Later

    The first anniversary of Crimea’s annexation is an occasion to refocus on Ukraine’s central challenge: the need to implement domestic reforms and limit Russian leverage. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    German Power and the Ukraine Conflict
    Mar26

    German Power and the Ukraine Conflict

    The Ukraine crisis has revealed both the strengths of German foreign policy-diplomatic skill and economic power-and its weakness-a lack of military muscle. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    Ukraine: The Kingdom of the Oligarchs
    Mar25

    Ukraine: The Kingdom of the Oligarchs

    Prospects for Ukraine’s long-term success and cohesion will be determined by its ability to pursue far-reaching reforms to modernize the state and to check the power of the oligarchs. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    A Blast From the Past
    Mar23

    A Blast From the Past

    Putin stated that the Russian leadership was ready to use nuclear forces in the days of the Crimean annexation. First of all, he tries to give the people an extra shot of the “superpower steroid,” but whether wittingly or not quite, the old threat of the nuclear war is back. | Русский …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    Long Live Minsk II?
    Mar23

    Long Live Minsk II?

    The Minsk agreements are fragile.How effectively they are implemented will depend primarily on the Europeans’ ability to convince Moscow to pressure separatists into observing the ceasefire, and on Kyiv’s ability to keep nationalist militias in line. If either side fails to do so, the fighting is likely to resume. …read more...

    Imitating Chavez: A Year of Nationalization in Crimea
    Mar19

    Imitating Chavez: A Year of Nationalization in Crimea

    Although it began with state-owned assets, the nationalization project in Crimea quickly consumed Ukrainian and Russian private property. One year on, every significant Crimean enterprise is in the hands of local authorities, and there is little hope for privatization. | Русский …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    Broken Ukraine
    Mar18

    Broken Ukraine

    The rise of an ungoverned, violent Donbass-which had a prewar population of six million-is likely to be one of the war’s most important lasting legacies. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

    Who Benefits From Ending Russian-Ukrainian Cooperation in the Space and Defense Sectors?
    Mar16

    Who Benefits From Ending Russian-Ukrainian Cooperation in the Space and Defense Sectors?

    The Russian government’s decision to end cooperation with Ukraine on two space launch programs is likely due to political motivations alone and goes against the economic and technological interests of Russia, Ukraine, and many other countries. This decision is worth reconsidering. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for...

    What’s Behind Lithuania’s Restored Compulsory Military Service?
    Mar10

    What’s Behind Lithuania’s Restored Compulsory Military Service?

    About seven years after abolishing compulsory military service and amidst the tense situation in Ukraine, Lithuania has restored conscription. Eurasia Outlook asked its experts to weigh in on the deeper meaning of this maneuver and what its consequences might be. …read more Source: Carnegie Endowment for International...

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