: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (USA)

    How Trump’s praise of Putin could cost him the election
    Oct04

    How Trump’s praise of Putin could cost him the election

    Donald Trump likes to mock Hillary Clinton for speaking to small crowds. So what was Trump doing last week giving a surprise speech to just 100 people in Chicago, Illinois — a state he has zero chance of winning? Answer: damage control. Trump seems to finally realize that his bizarre embrace of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and questioning of...

    Hungary’s referendum had more to do with Russia than immigration
    Oct04

    Hungary’s referendum had more to do with Russia than immigration

    On Sunday, the vast majority of those Hungarians who showed up at the polls said “no” to the question of whether “the European Union should have the power to impose the compulsory relocation of non-Hungarian citizens to Hungary without the consent of the National Assembly of Hungary”. Yet with a turnout well below 50 per cent, the controversial...

    The downside of opening the floodgates of anti-Saudi lawsuits
    Sep28

    The downside of opening the floodgates of anti-Saudi lawsuits

    Over the last seven plus years of the Obama presidency, Congress has done little to constrain a leader who arrogated to himself more executive authority than any president in recent memory. Obamacare? Check. Iran deal? Check. Iraqi troop withdrawal? Check. Annexation of Crimea? Nada. North Korea nuclear tests? Nada. Spread of ISIS and al Qaeda?...

    Leading from below
    Sep26

    Leading from below

    Complaining about the weaknesses of European military forces has long been a favorite sport of American politicians, defense officials and pundits; this is one issue on which populists and the Establishment agree. Indeed, presidential candidate Donald Trump’s threats to withdraw from NATO unless European members pay up are really only...

    The national security crisis neither candidate is talking about, but should be
    Sep26

    The national security crisis neither candidate is talking about, but should be

    During the 1988 presidential debates, no one asked either of the candidates about Iraq, yet soon the US was at war in the Persian Gulf to repel Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait. During the 2000 presidential debates, no one asked either candidate about the threat from al Qaeda, yet within months al Qaeda had attacked the American homeland and the...

    Socialism and famine
    Feb26

    Socialism and famine

    My colleague Mark Perry posted recently a great excerpt from Alan Charles Kors’ classic essay on the ghastly death toll caused by socialism, and the disgraceful willingness of so many “intellectuals” to avert their eyes from that tragic reality. I urge everyone to read Mark’s post; and let me add two observations.First, The Black Book...

    US-ROK-Japanese trilateral security cooperation: A US perspective
    Feb23

    US-ROK-Japanese trilateral security cooperation: A US perspective

    When President Barack Obama announced his much-touted “rebalance” to Asia in a speech in Australia in November 2011, his administration believed that its new stance toward the Asia-Pacific policy would be his foreign policy legacy. Having ended, so they hoped, America’s military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan, their emphasis on...

    The UK’s global engagement begins in Europe
    Feb22

    The UK’s global engagement begins in Europe

    The advocates of Brexit like to paint an optimistic picture of a post-EU Britain as an active, globally engaged power. ‘Who has the parochial mindset here,’ asks Dan Hannan, ‘those who want a global role of the United Kingdom, or those who think that our role must be mediated by Federica Mogherini, the EU’s Foreign Minister?’...

    How Russia controls American policy
    Feb13

    How Russia controls American policy

    We’ve seen this movie—now playing in Syria– before.The Russians have developed a way of getting the US formally to permit offensive Russian military operations against American partners on the ground, all the while calling it a ceasefire.What the Russians are proposing in Syria—a “cessation of hostilities” on terms they get to define– is...

    The Syrian ceasefire is a big win for Russia, Assad, and Iran
    Feb12

    The Syrian ceasefire is a big win for Russia, Assad, and Iran

    The Syrian ceasefire agreement of February 11 is a big win for the Russians and the Syrian regime. Russia, Iran, and Syria are in the midst of a major military offensive that has allowed them to besiege Aleppo and has them poised to make gains across the battlefield. This so-called “cessation of hostilities” agreement allows them to consolidate...

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